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the outer banks are a shifting pile of sand

Familiar names and ancient history mark the Outer Banks.

Beautifully written and carefully researched, Molly McArdle’s article for Oxford American Magazine, poses important questions about life on the Outer Banks and its fragile environment.

June sunrise at Rodanthe on Hatteras Island.

June sunrise at Rodanthe on Hatteras Island.

“Beach sky is different than prairie sky: it bleeds into the water, without boundary. Often on the Outer Banks, especially down on Hatteras Island, where the beach has worn so thin that ocean and sound are barely two hundred yards apart, I feel like I am on some other planet, an outer space of air and water. Though I have traveled farther from my home in the Northeast, and to places more remote, none feels quite so distant—foreign and far away—as this shifting, ancient pile of sand off the coast of North Carolina, twenty-five miles from the mainland.”

The complex history of the Outer Banks in a beautifully written piece in Oxford American Magazine.

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